Telling the Tragic Truth of the Church of God in Christ, A Post-Mortem

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In the weeks leading up to the 107th Holy Convocation of the Church of God in Christ, I wrote an open letter to Bishop Charles E. Blake and to the General Board imploring them to make a visible and vocal statement concerning the situation demanding justice for Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri–only 12 miles from the site of their yearly convention in downtown St. Louis.  My list of demands were as follows:

  1. The policing tactics of Ferguson Police Department be immediately reviewed and the police chief be immediately removed from office.
  2. The city of St. Louis shall pass an ordinance that all St. Louis police officers must wear cameras to record their actions and the actions of citizens.
  3. Missouri state legislature and Gov. Jay Nixon sign into law that the burden of proof is lowered severely for a grand jury indictment of a police officer who shoots an unarmed citizen

The list were specifically not directed at Darren Wilson, nor had any elements of race, but were aimed at using the tools within our democratic structure to effect change in the law.  This is a tried and true tactic.  Once the law is changed, then it gives citizens the legal leverage to prevent further injustices from occurring and when or if they do, proper legal redress can happen.  This was the case with the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments as well as the Brown v. Topeka Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  Municipal laws across the country didn’t change overnight as a result of these watershed moments, but organizations like the NAACP were able to challenge those laws, those injustices, in the judicial system and effectively had those local laws changed.

But, Bishop Blake, and the General Board left my letter unanswered.

As fate would have it, by this Monday morning, November 10, the wider citizenry was not talking about COGICs involvement in Ferguson, nor there lack of, but actually the declared “deliverance” of a young man during one of the services during the convention.  Rather than having a conversation about Ferguson and it’s wider impact on society, many are having a conversation about foolishness.

In the immediate hours and days following the open letter, I had the opportunity to offer further reflection amongst colleagues that illuminated around half of the comments, retweets and status messages were in support of the sentiment of the letter.  It seemed as though at the bare minimum majority of people, COGIC and non-COGIC felt that there should at least be a serious conversation about what should this denomination’s involvement be concerning the Ferguson situation even if that fell short of an actual demonstration through marching.  The rest of comments ranged from those who felt I wasn’t qualified to call out a bishop, let alone the Presiding Bishop, to those who referred to Bishop Elijah Hankerson’s involvement in Ferguson with the “Glory Train” where “over 300 souls have given their life to the Lord Jesus” as evidence of the denomination being involved in Ferguson.  In more direct conversations with respected friends and colleagues, both COGIC and non-COGIC, I discovered that fundamental Pentecostal theology is where I am most challenged.

The prevailing theology that exists throughout many COGIC churches is one that is affixed on holy living on earth for the sake of a heavenly reward later.  Historically, this theology rooted in slave religion provided an eschatological escape from the existential hell that the descendants of African slaves had to endure on a daily basis.  This theology isn’t new, and to be fair, it is not exclusive to the Church of God in Christ, but it is one that has been part of clergy complacency for decades.  In 1961, the esteemed pastor, Rev. Gardner C. Taylor pulled out from the National Baptist Convention, breaking away from long-time serving president Rev. Joseph J. Jackson over the issue of ecclesiastical involvement in the existential hell of Jim Crow segregation in the South.  Rev. Taylor walked out, along with Martin Luther King and formed the Progressive National Baptist Convention.  Even quiet as it’s kept, some reports say that in the “wilderness” years following COGIC founder Bishop Charles Mason’s death in 1961, that his immediate predecessor, Bishop O.T. Jones made a statement to the effect that the Church of God in Christ should focus on prayer and the like when it came to matters of civil rights. In 1963, when King penned “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” he made the theological and social argument for clergy to be very much involved in the affairs of justice.

In deep disappointment I have wept over the laxity of the church. But be assured that my tears have been tears of love. There can be no deep disappointment where there is not deep love. Yes, I love the church. How could I do otherwise? l am in the rather unique position of being the son, the grandson and the great-grandson of preachers. Yes, I see the church as the body of Christ. But, oh! How we have blemished and scarred that body through social neglect and through fear of being nonconformists.

There was a time when the church was very powerful in the time when the early Christians rejoiced at being deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society. Whenever the early Christians entered a town, the people in power became disturbed and immediately sought to convict the Christians for being “disturbers of the peace” and “outside agitators”‘ But the Christians pressed on, in the conviction that they were “a colony of heaven,” called to obey God rather than man. Small in number, they were big in commitment. They were too God intoxicated to be “astronomically intimidated.” By their effort and example they brought an end to such ancient evils as infanticide. and gladiatorial contests.

Things are different now. So often the contemporary church is a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. So often it is an archdefender of the status quo. Par from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the church’s silent and often even vocal sanction of things as they are.

But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century. I meet young people every day whose disappointment with the church has risen to outright disgust.

Unfortunately, we’re already there: the millennial generation who’s disappointment with the church has turned to outright disgust.  How can a body of faith believers be so heavenly minded that they are no earthly good?  How can a denomination claim to have this pneumatological power and have their entire week of services and ministry be reduced to a sound bite of a young man on the mic and ministers spouting church dogma centralized around rebuke and existential duality that flies in the face of psychological wholeness.  The contemporary Church of God in Christ is no different than white clergy that King railed against in the 1960s that failed to see the need to craft a social justice theology that liberated blacks not just from the physical bounds of segregation, but also liberated their conscience.

To my knowledge, COGIC Scholars held a panel discussion (something that they do at both Auxiliaries in Ministry convention and at Holy Convocation) about Ferguson of which Rev. Leonard Lovett, Ph.D. was a participant.  I was also told that a small cadre of 50 or so people did journey to Ferguson and proselytized to people and about the same number of souls were saved.  If holding on to a dogmatic theological tradition that stands silently by when the same people who fill the seats week after week are being marginalized and maligned by a system that is hell-bent on their destruction as a people, as a culture and an identity is considered “holiness” and what the Lord the requires, then I want no part of that larger faith tradition.

Jesus’ death on the cross was a lynching.  In a very human and real sense, it was a political death; one at the hands of judicial system and he suffered a political and legal death.  It was legal not just by the courts, but also by society–because they stood by and supported it; they stood by and said nothing.  Every time we stand by in silence we become accomplices in the act of injustice.  The Church of God in Christ had the opportunity, and was poised to lead masses of people into a wider understanding of the role of institutional Black Church.  This was their opportunity to show that they are more than just “big hats, loud suits and alligator shoes”; that it is more substance than a new praise break.  Instead COGIC has become the poster-child for a millennial generation that, as King said, “will be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century.”

Echoing the words of King, the Church of God in Christ was posed the question was this a safe move, and cowardice agreed; expediency asked what would be the political damage if we actually protested and the response was “too much.”  The tunnel-vision eschatology that acts as the nascent conscience of the denomination only asked would such a bold political save more souls and further one’s progression toward heaven, and it answered “no, it shall not.”

For the Church of God in Christ to be so close to the site of Mike Brown’s death, to occupy the same metropolitan space in which angst is rife in the air and not say or do anything it’s as if they stood by and watched Jesus be wrongfully put to death–and said nothing.

The tragedy is in the silence.

In the righteous indignation of the One Who Was, Who is and Who Is Yet to Come,
Joshua L. Lazard, the Uppity Negro

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50 thoughts on “Telling the Tragic Truth of the Church of God in Christ, A Post-Mortem

  1. I read your open letter and I agreed with you 100% …. it is a shame that the leaders of the Church did not extend you the common courtesy of an “Open Response”… but nonetheless they should not feed the hands that are slaughtering our lambs…Peace in Jesus Christ our Lord Name… Amen.

  2. Reblogged this on Zera Today Blog and commented:
    This is a powerful annotation to the folly of the post COGIC Convocation viral video show. What will churches do in the wake of greater threats of civil unrest?

  3. It is not your place to bash the church of God in christ for not responding to your letter. Ferguson is an issue but have you considered that there is a reason for not responding to you? One is to show that you don’t tell Bishop Blake to respond when you want him to and if they felt the need to do something, they would have. Maybe they have and you just don’t know it. It’s a matter of wisdom and doing things at the right time. If you are so desperate for these things to be done then why didn’t you write a letter to the city itself? Why don’t you do it yourself. Shame on you for bashing an entire denomination for not responding to you. And you are? I didn’t think so. This is garbage.

    1. Help me understand how does legitimate social and theological critique equate to bashing? I’m lost at the logic of this.

      1. So my question is Kilby how is it bashing? For years COGIC has been so no one is on our level. The moment someone says something that challenges them they are deemed disrespectful or off. For St. LOUIS to serve as the new meeting place or head quarters something should have been done. They generate 40 million atleast in a week that is economic power. Something could have been said.

  4. How dare you compare this to watching jesus being persecuted and doing nothing. Michael brown was doing the wrong at the wrong time and fate just caught up with him. Isn’t it us Christians that teach about our wrongdoings catching up with us? Hmm… was jesus doing wrong? No he wasn’t so this is no comparison. You have to look at it from every angle. Besides no one really knows why he was shot like that. You weren’t there? Okay. Cogic acts on facts. Period.

    1. You’re right, I wasn’t there when Mike Brown was shot. Neither were you there when Jesus was killed.

      Nice try, but you got to come better than that with me.

  5. I work within a huge church organization and I work in the administrative offices. You must understand that there are thousands of letters that come in daily. My boss can only sit and read through a few of them daily because of traveling to minister and also there is just too much to do. You have no idea of how long it is to pick through everything!

    Your letter probably wasn’t read yet because it is sent to him in an order by date upon receipt. If he gets to your mail it’ll probably be within a few days sometimes weeks.

    I said all that to say.. You cannot bash the organization on the basis that your personal vendetta or demands weren’t answered as quickly as you would like them to be. You have no clue of the circumstances surrounding it. You’re speaking based on assumptions….

    Now I do apologize for your loss however, your demands aren’t what causes action bro! Your prayers and your diligence with getting connected with the justice system to hear your. Or people within your community!

    Never bash someone off of assumptions!

  6. Wow! I agree 100%! Some of these comments are missing the mark though smh….. It is something much larger than a pastor not responding to a letter, as some have put (which for the record, I am pretty certain that is not your sentiment AT ALL) but the issues iThe Church AT LARGE and those with a voice of influence aren’t addressing the injustices right on the front doo r.

  7. Sooo, you want the church to get involved, but don’t want the Gospel, or what the father has to say about the matter. How do you get it both ways? As my mother use to say, every battle is not my battle! Their focus and goal was not Ferguson! Its amazing how people will want the church to help, but doesnt want the God of the Church!!! SMH

  8. You wrote, “The prevailing theology that exists throughout many COGIC churches is one that is affixed on holy living on earth for the sake of a heavenly reward later.” Do you have a citation. Do you have any credential to indicate that this is a qualified opinion?

    And, even if it is true, and in fact I do think it is arguably true, can you certify that this is Bishop Blake’s theology, which I am confident you cannot.

    1. This is from the COGIC website:

      “We believe in the sanctifying power of the Holy Spirit, by whose indwelling the Christian is enabled to live a holy and separated life in the present world.”

      Like I said “holy living on earth” which is separated from reality at times IMO. This is where the problem lies.

      To your point about Bishop Blake, if as presiding bishop he doesn’t espouse the tenets of the denomination, then that’s problematic. Moreover, what kind of question is that? Can you easily prove what his personal theology is?

      Credentials? Seriously. smh.

  9. I was one of the ones who responded to your first post of the “open letter” and certainly give you credit for being a well-read, intelligent and perceptive young man. You seem to be someone who holds to or at least parallels with a liberation theology, and you bash the denomination by comparing it to clergy in the 1960’s that “failed to see the need to craft a social justice theology”. I have heard many of the learned arguments both for and against liberation theology. My primary issue is that on the surface, it is difficult for me to interpret any of Jesus’ teachings, or even the Apostles preaching and actions as anything other than what context clearly makes them, which are teachings of the Kingdom of God, obedience to God and the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The fact that Jesus, as well as the Apostles in the Acts of the Apostles, challenged the status quo and “upset the apple cart”, was simply the effect of their teaching and preaching on those in power. But for the modern church, the message and the preaching itself is the critical thing to remember, rather than the effect of the preaching on social justice.

    I DO believe the church should impact the community. But I believe that impact should be through the message of change that the Gospel brings. I don’t think that the “activism” of marching, protest, etc. is the primary purview or responsibility of the church or clergy, notwithstanding my respect for Dr. King and his principles. The primary responsibility of the church as the “pillar and ground of truth” is to declare to the world the Gospel of Jesus Christ. And that is just what the Church of God in Christ has been doing, even in relation to Ferguson. And to almost belittle the preaching that has saved souls during the “glory train” in Ferguson as if that is of no consequence, misses that it is in fact of the greatest consequence, because in that instance the church, as the body of Christ and His “ambassador”, is doing exactly what is its job and primary function, which is to bring hearts and souls to knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ.

    There are community based organizations whose primary organizational mandate is the pursuit of social justice, such as the NAACP and the National Action Network. And where possible the church can and should partner with those organizations to impact the community and argue for social change. However, the church must maintain its focus on preaching the Gospel and building the Kingdom of God, as that comprises the “greater works” which Jesus stated those that followed His name would do in His name. Though Jesus’ teaching was radical and challenged both the Sanhedrin and the Roman culture, Jesus never organized any marches on Rome, nor did He organize protests, He simply taught the people such that they could walk in a greater understanding and relationship with God the Father. The Apostles challenged the status quo because of the teaching in the name of Jesus which the status quo denied his Deity, but neither did they organize marches or protests against the powers that be, but rather when the powers that be committed injustice against them, whipped and jailed them, they organized PRAYER MEETINGS! Such examples that have been set before us in the Word are the what the modern church should adhere to. Stay on mission and on target and the Church will fulfill its God-ordained purpose in the earth.

    1. Who’s to say one’s “God-ordained purpose” isn’t to be an activist or to adopt a theological view of activism?

      I’m just bothered at the way people bifurcate the two: as if social activism in the world negates salvation, because the reverse certainly seems to be the case.

  10. For everyone that’s disagree with this articles doesn’t know COGIC. History Bishop C.H. Manson was very active in Social Justic till he was black listed by the FBI where before the civil rights movement. Research to find out why. So I do believe if he was alive the church would have had an initiative in play for ferguson. The church is to busy worshipping mason, dressing up, and collecting offerings; that their missing God.

    1. Oh we know Cogic. Don’t go there. Bishop Mason believed in wisdom and even he wouldn’t take “demands” from anyone. It’s a matter of respect. It’s not like bishop Blake doesn’t see what’s going on but where was “uppity negro” when the news announced that these demands were already under consideration? Why would bishop Blake go and repeat what’s already taking place. If you were truly COGIC you would defend it not agree with it. And it is still uncalled for to bash the entire denomination. Cogic is great and always has been known for helping those in need and of course saving souls. Wisdom ppl

  11. The teachings of the Apostles and Christ on the day Pentecost were exercised on the day if Penteost ,after they were unified ,each filled with power and they immediately openly carried their message to the street,insomuch that they were thought radical or drunks.They were persecuted, arrested and mocked.Just as real as the message of love and redemption of God there was condemnation of dominance of government and religious powers.Any church that is so big it cannot respond to a personal letter becayse they receive So many in a day,has grown away from it`s message and is missing a part of it`s body.Such a big congregation of followers should be able to utilize it members.Christ`s message was backed with deed and works,first to a society that ruled against any voice that oppoessed it.The laws if this land guarantee it`s people an open field to openly exercise their cry against injustices.

    1. It’s not so much that this was one lowly letter they didn’t respond to. I know that this was sent to bishops on the General Board and they chose to ignore it.

      smh.

  12. I grew up a very Christian and Pentecostal home and very recently I’ve been dealing with my own troubles concerning Pentecostal theology, church politics, and the black church. This article definitely vocalized some of my issues. I never understood why the churches I grew up never addressed the issues that directly affected their members.

  13. I commend you for addressing this social Gospel concern. COGIC is a powerful organization that is failing to voice the complete Gospel. Injustice must be dealt with with both prayer and action. Until God is taken out of theory and manifest into works, change may never happen.

  14. I share your sentiment on many levels. Your post is vald and its point is partially proven by some of the responses to it. I find it laughable that people ignored substance and quickly tried to put you in your place. In reality your open letter fell on deaf ears, whether it was read or not. But you did what was right and called it how you saw it. To me their slience on the matter and patronage of a metropolitan area that should be boycotted proves they are incapable of leading or even bringing about any real change here and now. So they put on a cowardly minstrel show and further perpetuated divisive lies.

    The time has passed for our generation to expect those who have traditionally held the National Stage to do what is right. We must draw from our own God given inner strength and break the fear induced paralysis permeating traditional Black American leadership. Clearly some in the COGIC Church thought it more important to display a “victory” in it’s war against homosexuality then to use its unified strength to bravley confront the real “principalities”, “powers” and “rulers of THIS world,” and to do battle with the “wicked spirits” that cause people to rationalize and justify the unfettered murder of their own.

    1. Again spoken from someone who isn’t Cogic. Why didn’t yall attack other denominations? Cogic isn’t the only denomination out there and it isn’t considered a black church anymore. We are very diverse. Again know the real facts.

      1. Since this is my blog, I’m going to take a bit more liberty and be a bit bolder in my comments:

        First of all, who is yall? I’m speaking for myself and my personal theological machinations. Secondly, what are you smoking–COGIC is a historically black denomination! National leadership is ALL black and the vast majority of the members are black.

        If you saw this as an attack and not a critique that speaks to your own limited view of the world. COGIC was the only denomination that had a national convention in St Louis in the months and weeks following the Mike Brown situation–if AME or National Baptist I would have been saying the same thing.

  15. Are you a part of church in God in Christ? The reason I ask, if so there would have been a better channel to facilitate. Your letter might not even have been read by the people you have desired to read it. Just sending a letter to a leader of a global organization may not have been the best choice. Especially if your letter was from “the uppity negro”. MLK and Malcolm didn’t just write to other organizations to do something. They impacted change themselves. Be blessed

    1. I’m really not sure what your historical background is, but you might want to check your facts on that statement: King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” was an open letter directed at clergy to do something. Secondly, through some connections with my alma mater, the open letter was given directly to bishops who sit on the General Board.

      1. I prefaced my letter statement with the word “just”. And his letter might have been received based on who he was and what he was already doing. And also you might know better than me, did he call out the ones who didn’t respond?

  16. WELL MY THOUGHTS ON THIS IS THAT I WAS A RANK SINNER STRUNG OUT ON CRACK COCAINE ON MY WAY TO A DEVILS HELL AND THANK GOD FOR JESUS THAT I AM SAVED, SANCTIFIED (WHICH MEANS SET APART), AND FILLED WITH THE PRECIOUS GIFT OF THE HOLY GHOST, SAVED BY GRACE FOR THE MASTERS USE. EVERY BELIEVER WHO ACCEPTS JESUS CHRIST AND LIVES THEIR LIFE ACCORDING TO THE “WORD OF GOD” IS BORN INTO THE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST. “YOU CAN’T JOIN IN, YOU MUST BE BORN AGAIN”. MY ELDEST DAUGHTER DIED JUNE 23, 2014 FROM OVARIAN CANCER AT HOME IN KELLER, TX. I WAS RIGHT THERE WITH HER WHEN SHE TOOK HER LAST BREATH, AND ON SEPTEMBER 14, MY 22 YR. OLD GRANDSON AND I WAS ON THE MEGABUS ON OUR WAY BACK DOWN TO TEXAS FOR THE OVARIAN CANCER WALK WHICH WAS TO TAKE PLACE SEPTEMBER 21, 2014. ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 MY YOUNGEST DAUGHTER, HER CHILDREN AND MY GRANDSON GOT A CALL THAT MY ONLY #1 SON WAS SHOT AND KILLED BY THE ST. LOUIS COUNTY POLICE. THANK GOD FOR JESUS THAT HE IS HELPING US TO COPE WITH ALL THAT HAS HAPPENED. I ALSO WANT TO THANK GOD FOR THE SAINTS OF GOD WHO ARE YET PRAYING FOR ME AND MY FAMILY, ALONG WITH MICHAEL BROWN’S FAMILY, THE TWO OTHER FAMILIES WHOSE SONS WERE ALSO KILLED BY POLICE OFFICERS, AND SO MANY OTHERS. WHAT SOME PEOPLE DON’T KNOW IS II CHRONICLES 7:14 WHICH GOD SAYS “IF MY PEOPLE WHICH ARE CALLED BY NAME WOULD HUMBLE THEMSELVES AND PRAY, AND SEEK MY FACE, AND TURN FROM THEIR WICKED WAYS, THEN WILL I HEAR FROM HEAVEN AND WILL FORGIVE THEIR SINS AND HEAL THE LAND. THERE ARE SHUT-INS THAT ARE GOING ON EVEN WHEN WE ARE SLEEPING WHERE THE PEOPLE OF GOD ARE ON THEIR KNEES PRAYING FOR OUR CITY. I WAS WITH PASTOR HANKERSON, EVANGELIST SHIRLEY WOOTEN (WHO IS THE WIFE OF BISHOP WOOTEN WHO IS ONE OF THE GENERAL BOARD MEMBERS), AND OTHER SAINTS OF GOD DOWNTOWN BEFORE THE CONVOCATION WALKING AND PRAYING AROUND THE BUILDING AND ON THE STREETS FOR GOD TO HELP US AND FOR GOD TO SAVE. IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL EXPERIENCE. WE MUST COME TOGETHER AS A PEOPLE, LOVE EACH OTHER AND PRAY TOGETHER. PRAYER IS A WEAPON AGAINST SATAN. THE HOLY CONVOCATION IS AWESOME. THERE WAS A PRAYER GOING ON EVERYDAY. I DON’T UNDERSTAND ALL OF THE GENERAL BOARD AND JURISDICTIONAL STUFF, BUT I DO KNOW THAT GOD IS IN CONTROL, AND HE LOVES US AND HE WILL AVENGE US OF OUR ADVERSARY WHO IS SATAN. NEITHER MY NAME, MY FAMILY’S NAME NOR MY SONS NAME WAS EVER MENTIONED FOR ANYONE PERSON TO HELP ME FOR THE MURDER OF MY SON, BUT I AM STILL TRUSTING THAT GOD WILL HELP ME TO!!!!! GOD BLESS YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  17. Well written and thoughtful. As a member of a large COGIC congregation I have similar reservations. I love and support my church with my talents, attendance and money. We have to be part of solutions for real people. Thanks.

  18. Well said and I hope all of these COGIC people will step back and look at your statements with an objective eye. Your statements are truthful and not meant to degrade or tear down but show light on an increasing problem within the black church.

    1. Thank you Derrick Pryor for the link to the Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. letter to Governor Jay Nixon.

      It’s important to be in the world as it to do the work that we are called to do. It is also important to speak truth to power when that power crushes the very people that Jesus ministered to in the New Testament.

  19. Hey Uppity, I am glad you wrote this. I am Apostolic and agree with many of your points. 12 miles away is a short distant and would have made a great impact to show up and show out, arm and arm chanting dont shoot. We need people in leadership who are going to make a stand for their community and we need people who are going to ask the tough questions and be critical (expressing or involving an analysis of the merits and faults of a work, I know people would find fault in that) of the organization.

  20. I thoroughly enjoyed this post, as well as the comments (although some of them are irrelevant, uneducated, and ignorant). Keep challenging “the church” to be better. As a former COGIC member (born and raised), I left the denomination for many of these same reasons you mentioned in your blog. I simply out-grew their myopic, dogmatic, judgmental, and (really) ignorant way of perceiving people, theology, God, and honestly, life in general. However, I believe reformation is here, and I want COGIC to be better, but that won’t happen until we are willing to look, learn, and truly listen to someone other than ourselves. We never know… that strange voice, just might speak on behalf of God (the center of all that is good, and all that is life) (Hebrews 13:2).

    Thanks again for this thought provoking and progressive post.

  21. I fully support Mike Brown as a role model for the African American community. The gentle giant, God rest his soul, is an inspiration to all!

  22. I was out on the street when bullets were flying and tear gas was in the air. My question for Bro Lazzard, where were you sir?

    Bishop Edwin C. Bass
    An engaged member of the Church of God on Christ.

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