If Ta-Nehesi Coates and Kendrick Lamar Had a Conversation…
Church and Society / Cultural Critique / Gender & Sexuality / Pop Culture / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / Religion / The Color Line / Theology of Preaching

If Ta-Nehesi Coates and Kendrick Lamar Had a Conversation…

  This has been an interesting moment in time for blackness.  The imperfect harmony of the nightmare that police brutality against black bodies along with the exoneration of whiteness and the beauty of black pride and some semblance of existential unity hearkening to years past.  Two hallmarks of this time period have been both Kendrick Lamar … Continue reading

Who Speaks for Michael Singleton?
Cultural Critique / Politics / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / The Color Line

Who Speaks for Michael Singleton?

“A coupla years ago, my homeboy was beat by police.  I wanted to go down with him and protest with him.  Honestly, my mom wasn’t on my mind…the police were just on my mind.” Those are words that 16-year-old Michael Singleton offered to WMAR the ABC affiliate of Baltimore in the days following what amounted … Continue reading

Rekia Boyd and the Myth of Modern-Day Black Male Exceptionalism
Cultural Critique / Pop Culture / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / The Color Line

Rekia Boyd and the Myth of Modern-Day Black Male Exceptionalism

The burden of carrying about blackness in this country is one that seems to compound exponentially as times goes on if you let it.  The state of being “in a rage all the time” as James Baldwin said is something that comes with a tax; there is a price to pay.  Relationships suffer, isolation sets in. … Continue reading

If You’re Reading This It’s Not Too Late to Start Writing: Black Public Intellectuals in a Ghost West Era
About The Uppity Negro / Cultural Critique / Pop Culture / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / The Color Line

If You’re Reading This It’s Not Too Late to Start Writing: Black Public Intellectuals in a Ghost West Era

Below is an excerpt from the essay Michael Eric Dyson that was recently published entitled “The Ghost of Cornel West” in the magazine The New Republic: This is no biased preference for the written word over the spoken; I am far from a champion of a Eurocentric paradigm of literacy. This is about scholar versus … Continue reading

Being True to Our Native Land: Why Thomas Chatterton Williams gets the race conversation wrong
Cultural Critique / Pop Culture / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / The Color Line

Being True to Our Native Land: Why Thomas Chatterton Williams gets the race conversation wrong

Oppression messes with the mind. That’s a sentiment that has stuck with me in earnest during the second half of 2014.  As I personally embroiled myself with online conversations around race and gender that I found supremely frustrating and watch a nation grapple with race in a different manner following the deaths of Eric Garner … Continue reading

Nothing to Lose, A Reflection
Cultural Critique / Politics / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro

Nothing to Lose, A Reflection

In lieu of flashpoint moments that have directly affected black Americans in the recent months, particularly the rape allegations of Bill Cosby, the tragic saga of Andrew “I am Delivert” Caldwell and the Church of God in Christ, and the prolonged moment of Ferguson that has has managed to arch over a few months, I … Continue reading

Dear White People: Simple Comedic Satire or Complex Real-Life Drama
Cultural Critique / Movie Reviews / Pop Culture / Random Thoughts from an Uppity Negro / The Color Line

Dear White People: Simple Comedic Satire or Complex Real-Life Drama

If you’re black and want to go to an HBCU, go watch “School Daze,” if you want to go to a PWI, go see “Dear White People.”  If you’re white and have no idea what I’m talking about, go watch both movies. Justin Simien’s directoral debut “Dear White People” was and is a refreshing look … Continue reading